“Protrude, Flow 2001” : 3D structure produced using magnetic ferrofluids.

University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo publishes the UEC September 2017 issue of the UEC e-Bulletin that includes feature articles on solutions to support people with hearing loss; convergence of science and art with three dimensional sculptures using magnetic ‘ferrofluids’; Research highlights on radar for environmental monitoring; astronomical spectroscopy in a laboratory; integrating nanocavities into optical fibers with femtosecond laser ablation; two dimensional materials for near infrared phototransistors; and innovative solid state lasers.

September 2017 issue of the UEC eBulletin
http://www.ru.uec.ac.jp/e-bulletin/
The September 2017 issue of the UEC e-Bulletin includes a feature article about research by Takuji Koike on his “quest to find effective solutions to support people with hearing loss”.
The Topics section focuses on the convergence of science and art, focusing on the work by artist and UEC Tokyo associate professor Sachiko Kodama’s on her rendering of dynamic, three dimensional sculptures using magnetic ‘ferrofluids’.

Research highlights from high impact publications are ‘Radar for environmental monitoring: new algorithms for high speed and low cost 3D imaging’, Shouhei Kidera; ‘Astronomical spectroscopy in a laboratory: Direct and accurate measurements of electron densities of plasmas’, Erina Shimizu and Safdar Ali; ‘Nanophotonics: Integrating nanocavities into optical fibers with femtosecond laser ablation’, Kohzo Hakuta; ‘Two dimensional materials: Advanced molybdenum selenide near infrared phototransistors’, Abdelkader Abderrahmane; and ‘Laser science: Innovative solid state lasers with Yb3+-doped CaF2 – LaF3 ceramic gain media’, Shotaro Kitajima and Hitoshi Ishizawa.

Feature

Frontiers of audiology: Quest to find effective solutions to support people with hearing loss

http://www.ru.uec.ac.jp/e-bulletin/feature/2017/quest-to-find-effective-solutions-to-support-people-with-hearing-loss.html

Takuji Koike is collaborating with medical doctors in Japan to clarify the origins of auditory problems as well as developing devices to support people suffering from hearing loss. “We are focusing on three main areas,” says Koike. “Gaining insights into the mechanisms governing hearing disorders for the development of effective treatments; measuring the response of fetuses to sound; and developing hearing aids that are implanted into the bone behind the ear.”

Topics

Convergence of science and art: Three dimensional dynamics of ferrofluid sculptures
http://www.ru.uec.ac.jp/e-bulletin/topics/2017/three-dimensional-dynamics-of-ferrofluid-sculptures.html

Sachiko Kodama is an artist internationally recognized for her renderings unique and dynamic three dimensional sculptures including “Protrude Flow” (2001), “Morpho Tower” (2006), and “Pulsar” (2008) by controlling the intricate interaction of magnetic field lines with solutions of dark and optically reflective ferrofluids

Research Highlights

Radar for environmental monitoring: New algorithms for high speed and low cost 3D imaging
http://www.ru.uec.ac.jp/e-bulletin/research-highlights/

Ultrawideband millimeter-wave radar devices are promising as high precision sensors to monitor environments where vision is hindered due to clouds and fog for applications including automobile collision avoidance systems. Importantly, during the identification of objects under such circumstances, raw data from the sensors must be rapidly and accurately processed into three dimensional images by so-called ‘conversion algorithms’.

Astronomical spectroscopy in a laboratory: Direct and accurate measurements of electron densities of plasmas
http://www.ru.uec.ac.jp/e-bulletin/research-highlights/2017/direct-and-accurate-measurements-of-electron-densities-of-plasmas.html

Here, Erina Shimizu and Safdar Ali at the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo, and colleagues, report on experimental measurements of electron density dependent lines ratios of highly charged Fe X, XI and XII—ions for which there are discrepancies between astrophysical observations and theoretical simulations.

Laser science: Innovative solid state lasers with Yb3+-doped CaF2 – LaF3 ceramic gain media
http://www.ru.uec.ac.jp/e-bulletin/research-highlights/2017/laser-science.html

Kitajima and colleagues fabricated CaF2 ceramics doped with two rare earth ions of La and Yb from 1 at. % La3+, 1 at. % Yb3+to 6 at. % La3+, 6 at. % Yb3+. The doping was carried out using a wet process to mix CaF2 with two kinds rare-earth fluorides with average diameters of 200 nm. This was followed by sintering first between 750°-900° in air followed by the hot isostatic pressing method between 700°-1000° in an inert atmosphere.

Two dimensional materials: Advanced molybdenum selenide near infrared phototransistors
http://www.ru.uec.ac.jp/e-bulletin/research-highlights/2017/two-dimensional-materials-advanced-molybdenum-selenide-near-infrared-phototransistors.html

Now, Abdelkader Abderrahmane and colleagues at the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo in collaboration with researchers at Chosun University, Korea, describe the optoelectronics characteristics of molybdenum selenide (MoSe2) phototransistors for applications to photodetectors. The application of gate voltages to the devices yielded a maximum photoresponsivity 238 A/W, an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 37,745% under 785 nm light.

Nanophotonics: Integrating nanocavities into optical fibers with femtosecond laser ablation
http://www.ru.uec.ac.jp/e-bulletin/research-highlights/2017/integrating-nanocavities-into-optical-fibers-with-femtosecond-laser-ablation.html

Here, Kohzo Hakuta and colleagues at the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo, report on the realization of one dimensional arrays of nanometer sized holes or ‘nano-craters’ on the surfaces of optical nanofibers by simply irradiating them with a single pulse of ultrashort light from a femtosecond laser. These so called ‘nanofiber based photonic crystal cavities’ are expected to find new applications in nanophotonics and quantum information science.

Further information:
International Public Relations
The University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo
1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585
Website: http://www.uec.ac.jp/

About The University of Electro-Communications
The University of Electro-Communications (UEC) in Tokyo is a small, luminous university at the forefront of pure and applied sciences, engineering, and technology research. Its roots go back to the Technical Institute for Wireless Commutations, which was established in 1918 by the Wireless Association to train so-called wireless engineers in maritime communications in response to the Titanic disaster in 1912. In 1949, the UEC was established as a national university by the Japanese Ministry of Education, and moved in 1957 from Meguro to its current Chofu campus Tokyo.

With approximately 4,000 students and 350 faculty, UEC is regarded as a small university, but with particular expertise in wireless communications, laser science, robotics, informatics, and material science, to name just a few areas of research.

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